Leovince Usa Purchased By Longtime Executive Vice President Tim Calhoun

Geared Up Powersports will continue to do business as LeoVince USA. Calhoun takes the helm as CEO and President of LeoVince USA. RICHMOND, CA October 2, 2013 ( Motor Sports Newswire ) LeoVince USA is now under the ownership of Geared Up Powersports, a California Limited Liability company owned by longtime LeoVince USA Executive Vice President Tim Calhoun. The company will continue to operate under the LeoVince USA name, with Calhoun stepping into the role of CEO and President. Sito Gruppo Industriale, the parent company of the LeoVince family of brands, is standardizing its global expansion operations. The Italy-based Sito has continued to expand its worldwide presence through strategic partnerships with nationally-based distributors. Now, Sito is partnering with Geared Up Powersports in an exclusive distribution agreement. Since 2004, Fusetta LLC (formerly operated as Sito USA LLC) was the US marketing and sales organization that sold and managed the LeoVince brand for the US and Canadian markets. On June 28th, 2013, Geared Up Powersports purchased the assets of Fusetta LLC under the direction of Calhoun. Geared Up Powersports will continue to do business as LeoVince USA with no interruptions in its current business operations. For Calhoun, who has run LeoVince USA since its inception over nine years ago, this is the next step toward expanding the operations of LeoVince USA and continuing to expand sales of the LeoVince family of brands throughout the North American market.

USA Boxing Accuses Mike Tyson Of Poaching Amateur Fighters

Olympic team in 2016. According to ESPN.com , USA Boxing head Dr. Charles Butler said in an open letter that Tyson’s recently formed Iron Mike Productions has been offering money to the best amateur fighters to turn pro — including 18-year-old Florida fighter Erickson Lubin, who some in amateur boxing believe to be the country’s best hope for a gold medal at the Rio Games. He says the money being offered is “pennies on the dollar” of what the prospects could be worth with an Olympic medal. “Mike, USA Boxing does not have the funds to compete with your offers,” the letter said. “If you have money and would like to assist these young athletes and the sport, you should donate for athlete stipends to support the training of these boxers and help your country regain its prominence on the medal stand. Please do not take them from us. If they win a medal for their country, you can always sign them to professional contracts at that time.” Iron Mike Promotions signed Lubin on Tuesday (October 1), his 18th birthday. He’s a two-time Junior Olympic national champion and won the 152-pound division at the National Golden Gloves this year. In his USA Boxing bio, the teen prospect said his goals were to win a gold medal at the Olympics, turn pro and win every title possible. “We want to be competitive and we want to increase our overall performance in the Olympic Games,” said USA Boxing executive director Anthony Bartkowski. “This is a new strategy of trying to make sure our Olympic-aged athletes are not poached by promoters. In the past, USA Boxing was passive and just accepted it.” While Tyson has yet to respond, he did retweet comments from his followers, one of which accused USA boxing of trying to “pimp young boxers w/o @mikeTyson interfering.”

USA Boxing swings at Mike Tyson

“This is a new strategy of trying to make sure our Olympic-aged athletes are not poached by promoters. In the past, USA Boxing was passive and just accepted it.” Tyson isn’t the only promoter trying to lure amateurs to the pros. Last month, DiBella Entertainment said it signed highly touted 17-year-old Junior “Sugar Boy” Younan of New York to a contract and said he would make his pro debut in late October or early November, after he turned 18. Boxing promoters have long trolled the amateur ranks looking for talent, especially in recent years as the lure of Olympic gold has faded for many fighters. Winning in the Olympics was once a guaranteed way to make millions, but as U.S. Olympic boxing teams have faded so have the prospects for Olympic fighters. The last American man to win an Olympic gold in boxing was Andre Ward in 2004, and last year’s team in London didn’t even medal. USA Boxing, meanwhile, has undergone a series of shake-ups and its funding has been cut by the U.S. Olympic Committee. The executive director of the USOC said Tuesday that boxing, a sport once dominated by Americans, is still trying to find a way to replicate earlier successes. “Boxing is one of those sports that I think we have a very rich tradition in, but not a lot of current performance,” Scott Blackmun said. “I think the recent reorganization of USA Boxing … is going to be very, very beneficial because it brings some very independent thinkers to the board. “But I don’t think you can take away the choices our athletes have.