Wanna Introduce A Film On Turner Classic Movies?

Who killed the major Halloween horror movies?

Armageddon (1998) Alternatively, NASAs non-essentials can take vicarious pleasure in this Michael Bay blockbuster about a crew of NASA recruits who save the planet from annihilation by a Texas-sized asteroid headed our way. Sure, its only a fantasy. But like we said, the U.S. space program today is mostly history anyway and the rest is fantasy. 5. The Shawshank Redemption (1994) The IRS says it would suspend all audits in a government shutdown, making life easier for Tim Robbins character, a onetime banker who as an inmate is compelled to cook the wardens books in this classic prison drama. 6. National Treasure (2004) A shutdown will close the National Archives, home of the Declaration of Independence. With the original document inaccessible, would-be viewers of Mr. Jeffersons ringing patriotic manifesto can turn instead to this Nicolas Cage caper flick, in which an invisible treasure map on the back of the Declaration serves as MacGuffin. Warning: Some scenes, including the theft of the Declaration from its institutional home,may be too intense for furloughed archivists. 7. Night at the Museum (2006) Most federal museum workers will be sent home. These empty museums are bad news if youre employed in one.

Its kind of a bummer. The month still features a large number of limited releases and video-on-demand horror films, such as Nothing Left to Fear (co-produced by former Guns N Roses guitarist Slash) opening Friday, All the Boys Love Mandy Lane (Oct. 11) and Haunter (Oct. 18), with Abigail Breslin. Theres even a spider invasion film starring Greg Grunberg as a hero exterminator called Big Ass Spiders (Oct. 18). But if youre in a small town, the multiplexes dont show these limited-run movies. So youre stuck at home watching them on VOD, says Ryan Rurek, the managing editor of horror film website ShockTillYouDrop.com. October is normally all about the communal experience of having it on the big screen and getting that energy rush in an audience. Its that time of year where everyone wants to share that. There are reasons for the October boo malaise. Horror movies have now become a year-round phenomenon, thriving even in the age of piracy and shrinking box office. In July, The Conjuring reigned as the box office champion while Insidious 2 was audacious in September. The horror hit Mama was supposed to come out in October 2012, but moved out of the crowded month for a January 2013 opening. Producer Guillermo del Toro says distributors are not afraid to put horror movies out anytime now.

on USATODAY.com: Incorrect please try again A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Wanna introduce a film on Turner Classic Movies? Whitney Matheson, USA TODAY 1:16 p.m. EDT October 2, 2013 A new contest will let a Turner Classic Movies fan co-host a film with Robert Osborne. (Photo: TCM) SHARE 6 CONNECT 8 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE If I watch a classic film on Turner Classic Movies, I make sure to catch Robert Osborne’s insightful introductions and postscripts. More often than not, he tells me something I didn’t know, and that even goes for movies I’ve seen dozens of times (like, say, The Graduate). This month, TCM is holding a contest that will let one lucky fan co-host a movie with Osborne. Over at the site for its ” Ultimate Fan Contest ,” you can submit a 90-second video of yourself introducing a classic film. Along with being featured on the air, the grand-prize winner will win a trip to the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, where he/she also will introduce a film. The contest just kicked off, so few submissions have been posted on the site. However, this clever sample sets the standard for what they’re looking for. TCM is accepting entries through Oct. 31.